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7 Ways to Improve Your Timing

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Dan the man, well... he's the man when it comes to behavioral psychology and how it applies to Marketing. Dan knows that you don’t have time for theory, so he highlighted a few tactical takeaways from his research.

Psychology of Timing?

Dan the man, well... he's the man when it comes to behavioral psychology and how it applies to Marketing. Besides the fact that he is a New York Times best-selling author, he gave a killer session about the psychology of timing and how it applies to Marketers.

Yes, when we do things matters for us and our prospects. Whether you are deciding what time to send an email or how long to run an ad campaign, this applies to you. Dan knows that you don’t have time for theory, so he highlighted a few tactical takeaways from his research.


1. Identify something as ``last`` to energize your audience

What are the top three ages someone is most likely to run their first marathon? 29, 39, 49. Oh and, 49-year-olds are 3x more likely to run their first marathon than 50-year-olds.

Takeaway → We kick harder when we are at the end of something


2. Consider short fuses over long ones

Okay, say I give one group a gift card that expires in 3-weeks and another that expires in 2 months, which group is more likely to use the card? According to the Journal of Marketing Research, 31% of group one and 6% of group two cashed it in. Long & short; where there is less time, we take action faster. Too much time causes us to delay initially and ultimately forget.

How can I apply this now →

Countdown Timer

Sales Countdown


3. We prefer uplifting endings to declining ones

Would you like the good news or the bad news first? According to The Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 4 out of 5 people prefer to hear the bad news first. Really? I thought it would be better to start off on a high note. Bad first, then good. Disney movies have known this all along.

Remember → Given a choice, we prefer endings that elevate

 

APPLY TO YOUR TEAM

Scheduling tasks based on time-of-day will improve performance by 20%


4. Mornings - deep, analytical work

You know this! You are at your peak early in the day, but here is a little something to make it real. Dan found that Anesthesiologists were 4x more likely to make an error at 3:00 pm than 9:00 am. Yeah... even doctors are at their best in the morning. Use the morning to write a report, analyze data, or decide on a strategy

 

How can I start my morning off right? →

Morning Routine


5. Midday- brainless, admin work

Dan found that the second most dangerous time on the road is between 2:00 & 4:00. This time can vary depending on the person, but save your low-value/admin tasks for midday. Also, please stop scheduling in-depth, analytical meetings in the afternoon! My brain hurts just thinking about it.

Monitor your tasks throughout the day →

Y-Productive


6. Late afternoon/evenings - insightful work

Your mood is high, but you are less vigilant and more easily distracted. Dan says this is our best time to solve problems with non-obvious solutions. Go ahead and schedule those fun brainstorming sessions!

Avoid distractions during this time→

Nudgeti


7. Take frequent breaks and change it up

Last but not least, change up your breaks. Here are 4 things Dan suggests: social rather than solo, moving rather than stationary, outside rather than inside, and get fully detached, i.e., leave your phone behind.

Forget to take breaks? →

Take a Break

7 Ways to Improve Your Timing
7 Ways to Improve Your Timing
7 Ways to Improve Your Timing
7 Ways to Improve Your Timing